Joshua Weiner: Berlin Alexanderplatz, April 2016

  The following essay is an excerpt from Joshua Weiner's Berlin Notebook (available on Amazon) out now from the Los Angeles Review of...
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Richard Jackson | Between Two Worlds: Ales Debeljak’s Dialectic Vision

In the end, he realizes it is art, the poem, that allows this vision: “butterflies, freed / from tapestries, would not survive on their own” unless the poet can preserve them. It is art after all that holds all time, all selves in a delicate harmony.

The Future of Genius

Does genius have a future in our understanding of literature?

Knud Sønderby

My desire to have a boat had been purely abstract, of the type that it was natural of course to have a boat when one lives by a fjord and has the convenience of being able to set it in the water anytime and go for a trip. It was effortless in thought.

Janusz Rudnicki

From Naples to Constantinople, just as long as it’s far from Copenhagen. Camels, sultans, dancing dervishes, the Orient is a mirror to his fantasy, and a balm for his ravished soul. If only his life were like the Thousand and One Nights. He understands now that fairytales are his true calling.

Gift and Gear: The Work of Thomas McGrath

Twenty five years ago, when I was still just learning how to write a poem, and trying to locate the deeper sources for the poetry I wanted to write, Thomas McGrath’s example stood as a sign post.  Here was a poet who could write any kind of poem he wanted ...

In Memoriam: Philip Levine

"... I got to the end, and I thought, the kid did it. It’s very witty.”

YES. Home. Fucking. Run.

“But,” Levine said, “it’s not a poem.”

Wait — what?

Bloodshot Rainbow: The Spectra of John D. MacDonald

By 1962, the novelist John D. MacDonald relented to pressure from his editors and began preparations for the creation of a lasting serial character. The result would be the “salvage consultant” and reluctant rescuer of lost causes, Travis McGee.

Imaginative Structures: Elizabeth Bishop’s “The Monument” and Loren MacIver’s “Shack”

Bishop and MacIver share concerns with the ways in which perspective and perception shape one another.

THE STORY: Natalia Fernandez on Roddy Doyle’s “Bullfighting.”

I’d always disliked family life. Even as a kid, I felt that the most pleasant moments had an air of melancholy. And then the rest, the rest was just dreadful.

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