Burt Kimmelman, Prague and Memory (Part III)

  PRAGUE AND MEMORY   Editor's Note: This is the third installment in a three-part series of a new work by American poet and critic...
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Burt Kimmelman, Prague and Memory (Part II)

Freedom, in Prague, is often expressed through codes of body language and speech that were bred during the totalitarian half-century (if not earlier) subsequent to the First Republic. People in Prague are heartfelt but watchful. Tentative, simultaneously full of hope, they look for the right signals.

Burt Kimmelman, Prague and Memory (Part I)

Absurdism and subversion are endemic here. Indeed, they make up the fabric of Czech life at a signal moment in Czech cultural-political history. They merge to become a third, exquisitely sharp, subtle, element in the Czech psyche: hilarity. It threatens the release of chaos into the Bohemian bloodstream.

Cherise Oakley

I pray. I pray for the future of my daughters. I cannot pass it on. I pray that my children grant me grace.

M. J. Arlett

Studies show lower-voiced women are considered more authoritative.

In Memoriam: Richard Wilbur, 1921–2017

A lot of poets jumped to attention when Ezra Pound instructed them to make it new. Wilbur’s stance seems wilfully retrograde, sailing back against the current. ... Yet his work shows us that there are other ways to be of our own time. Closed forms can enable and embody chaos, sometimes more instructively than experimental approaches.

Justin Quinn: Bohuslav Reynek’s Journeys

By remembering how many foreign debts anglophone poetry has accrued over the centuries of its existence ... we are reminded that a poet like Reynek, who seems to emerge from a faraway country of which we know little, is part of the same tradition ... This is lyric poetry of a type in which the poet uses certain patterns of rhyme and pacing that many previous generations have. It is a way of finding likenesses in both words and the world, or sometimes impressing phonic likenesses on disparate experiences, and savoring the phases of that difference.

Political Knott: David Rivard on Bill Knott’s “VOI (POEM) CES” | The Poem

One thing we can be certain of: were he alive, Bill’s poems would differ greatly from most of those now being written about our political situation.

Joshua Weiner: Berlin Alexanderplatz, April 2016

The way he hovers beside her, slightly in front of her, refusing to be dismissed, suggests the persistence of an established relationship. But for his dress, they could be mistaken for lovers in a kind of quiet public quarrel.

Richard Jackson | Between Two Worlds: Ales Debeljak’s Dialectic Vision

In the end, he realizes it is art, the poem, that allows this vision: “butterflies, freed / from tapestries, would not survive on their own” unless the poet can preserve them. It is art after all that holds all time, all selves in a delicate harmony.

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