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B O D Y Best of the Net Nominations

  B O D Y is proud to present our nominees for the 2017 Best of the Net Anthology.   POETRY: Michael Collier for Meadow Katrina...
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L.S. McKee

L.S. McKee

Buzzard Goad stared at the old bridge. He’d always thought it would collapse one day ... the girders were rusted, the pilings vibrated with every passing car, and its lanes were so narrow, headlights rubbed like the sweat of racehorses. He was pretty sure most folks held their breath when they crossed it.

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Friday Pick: Eric Ekstrand’s Laodicea

The book’s most conspicuous motivation is to make poetry happen between “you” and the poem; that is to say where the line ends, your imagination cannot idle and where, deliberately, the words do not say it all, it is the reader’s mind that finishes the thought.

Weiner-Seal

Re: Word: Joshua Weiner’s “To Disturb Profoundly The Senses”

"To Disturb Profoundly the Senses" is a deconstructed appropriation of material from the so-called "Torture Memos" penned by the Bush Six at the Office of Legal Counsel

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Friday Pick: Annus Mirabilis

Lift your reading glasses for a toast: Last night we celebrated the first birthday of B O D Y with a listening party in the heart of Prague.

Photo: Casey Curry

Re: Word: Natashia Deon

I am dead. I died a nigga a long time ago. Before you were born, before your mother was born, ‘fore your grandmother. I was seventeen. Still am I reckon. And everyone that was there that night is dead now too so it don't matter that I was a nigga. Or a slave.

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B O D Y 1st Birthday Bash

Join us for an evening of literature at the Anglo-American University Library (Letenská 118/1, Prague 1) on July 11 at 7:30 PM, as B O D Y celebrates its wildly successful first year of existence.

milosz

Friday Pick: Czeslaw Milosz’s Road-Side Dog

The prose forms Miłosz employs in this collection seem to free him from the rhetorical and formal scaffolding of his poetry, allowing keen insights into quotidian moments and everyday objects while remaining unencumbered by the complex demands of verse.

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Friday Pick: All That Is, By James Salter

With what may be his final book, James Salter has a crowning achievement: A fine, full novel that passes from literature into life, and back again.

raymond-chandler

Friday Pick: Literary Names, By Alastair Fowler

Fowler's most significant points concern the Elizabethan and Victorian eras, and he seems to have an overly bleak outlook on the post-modern age.

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