Caitríona O’Reilly

Talking Silence: Caitriona O’Reilly’s Geis | Friday Pick

  Geis By Caitríona O’Reilly Bloodaxe Books 2015, 64 pp Caitríona O’Reilly’s intriguingly obscure poems offer peeks into the...
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Cathal McCabe

Friday Pick: Cathal McCabe’s Outer Space

The most powerful poems in McCabe’s belated debut are arguably those that subtly twist traditional form and subject matter.

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Story Book By Douglas Piccinnini | Friday Pick

Story Book gives an indication of what might happen when a novel is written from a poet's point of view. It is a book of beginnings, a collection of stories that do not end.

AS

Friday Pick: Transit, by Anna Seghers

Seghers creates a spectacle of shadows indelible as any film.

thomas-mcgrath

Gift and Gear: The Work of Thomas McGrath

Twenty five years ago, when I was still just learning how to write a poem, and trying to locate the deeper sources for the poetry I wanted to write, Thomas McGrath’s example stood as a sign post.  Here was a poet who could write any kind of poem he wanted ...

photo credit: Ian Douglas

Friday Pick: Delicious Foods by James Hannaham

"Everybody black knows how to react to a tragedy. Just bring out a wheelbarrow full of the Same Old Anger, dump it all over the Usual Frustrations, and water it with Somebody Oughtas"

rail_evan

Refresh Your Imagination: Evan Rail’s The Brewery in the Bohemian Forest | Friday Pick

Failing any opportunities for Kout-drinking in the UK, let me paraphrase the advertising slogan for a beer Evan Rail would never drink: with its intoxicating slow ferment of beer and history, The Brewery in the Bohemian Forest refreshes parts of the imagination that other writing just can’t reach.

Joseph Massey

Friday Pick: Joseph Massey’s To Keep Time

Usually when poetry turns to the individual and the spirit, it includes love, but Massey lacks even this. There are no accounts of relationships, no “I love her” and “she loves me”. But many other types of relationships are described ...

Joshua-Mehigan

Marvelous Indecision: Joshua Mehigan’s Accepting the Disaster | Friday Pick

Like an idiot savant, Mehigan tries to talk about every subject in as plain a manner as possible, but because the world is complex, sardonic, knowing, this often leads him to cliffs that give a shocking view of contemporary life.

Photo by Sándor Jászberényi

Friday Pick: Sandor Jaszberenyi’s “The Devil is a Black Dog”

The response that arises from his feverish brain really isn’t all that different from the long literary tradition of the westerner coming to Asia or Africa in search of truth and spiritual clarity, except that these are far more dangerous times and he has come to their most dangerous places, finding a kind of Zen at the barrel of a Kalashnikov.

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